The Oslo Agreement In 1993

The Oslo Agreement In 1993

The exclusion of Jerusalem and settlements from the territories to be transferred to the Palestinians would not alter the Israeli presence, including the army, to protect them, without a negotiated agreement. The agreements also preserve Israel`s exclusive control of the borders, airspace and territorial waters of the Gaza Strip. Oslo II, Article XII: Fearing the failure of the peace process, the Clinton administration participated more actively in the Israeli-Palestinian negotiations. In January 1997, after intense American mediation, Israel and the Palestinian Authority signed the Hebron Protocol, which provided for the transfer of most of Hebron under Palestinian control. In October 1998, Clinton received Netanyahu and Arafat at the Wye River Plantation, where they negotiated an agreement calling for further Israeli exits from the West Bank. However, the dispute over the implementation of Wye`s memorandum brought down Netanyahu`s government in January 1999. The agreement means abandoning the dream embodied by the Palestinian National Convention by recognizing the limits of power to create the injustice of war and distraction and recognizing that Israel is here to stay. The Clinton administration and the Arab-Israeli peace process, the new mayor of Jerusalem in 1993-96, and then Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, rejected the agreement and called it a “dark cloud over the city.” He preferred to bring more Jews to East Jerusalem and extend Jerusalem to the east. [6] The Oslo Accords are an agreement between the Government of Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO): the Oslo I Agreements, signed in 1993 in Washington, D.C. [1] and the Oslo II Agreements signed in Taba, Egypt, in 1995.

[2] The Oslo Accords marked the beginning of the Oslo process, a peace process aimed at reaching a peace treaty on the basis of UN Security Council Resolutions 242 and 338 and respecting the “right of the Palestinian people to self-determination”. The Oslo process began after secret negotiations in Oslo, which led to the PLO`s recognition of the State of Israel and Israel`s recognition of the PLO as a representative of the Palestinian people and negotiating partner. Negotiations between Israel and the PLO, which eventually culminated in the Oslo Accords, began clandestinely in 1993 in Oslo, Norway. This agreement is a beginning, not an end. It triggers a process that, for the first time since the creation of Israel in 1948 and the expropriation and dispersal of the Palestinians, raises real hope for a peaceful resolution of the seemingly most tenacious conflict in the world. As the United States, Europe and Arab nations continued to invest their hopes in the talks to reach a final agreement, settlement construction tripled in the occupied West Bank and grew at an unprecedented rate. A second agreement, the result of the Oslo negotiations signed in 1995, divided the occupied West Bank into three non-coherent regions: Areas A, B and C.